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Insiya Hussain

Assistant Professor

Department:     Management

Research Areas:     Business Communication, Dispute Resolution, Diversity, Organizational Behavior

Insiya Hussain headshot

Insiya Hussain is an Assistant Professor of Management. Her research focuses on understanding how employees can overcome the challenges of speaking up at work to share their ideas and opinions, advocate social issues, and negotiate for personal rewards. Insiya’s research has been published in Academy of Management Journal and Journal of Applied Psychology. Her work has also been featured in practitioner outlets including Harvard Business Review. She is a member of the Editorial Review Board at Academy of Management Journal and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Prior to joining academia, Insiya worked at J.P. Morgan’s investment bank and as a Project Manager at technology companies. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Columbia University, and her Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from the University of Maryland.

ACADEMIC LEADERSHIP & AWARDS

2020

McCombs Research Excellence Grant

 

2019

All S.T.A.R. Fellowship, University of Maryland

 

2019

Allan N. Nash Award for Outstanding Doctoral Student

 

2017

Outstanding Reviewer Award, Academy of Management OB Division, 2015

 

2016

Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Maryland

 

Publications

Park, H., Tangirala, S., Hussain, I., & Ekkirala, S. (2022). How and when managers reward employees’ voice: The role of proactivity attributions. Journal of Applied Psychology (advance online publication).

Park, H., Tangirala, S., & Hussain, I. (2022). The unintended consequences of asking for employee input. Harvard Business Review Digital Article, Feb. 18.

Parke, M., Tangirala, S., & Hussain, I. (2021). Creating organizational citizens: How and when supervisor- versus peer-led role interventions change organizational citizenship behavior. Journal of Applied Psychology, 106(11), 1714–33.

 

Hussain, I., & Tangirala, S. (2019). Why open secrets exist in organizations. Harvard Business Review Digital Article, Jan. 14.

Hussain, I., Shu, R., Tangirala, S., & Ekkirala, S. (2019). The voice bystander effect: How information redundancy inhibits employee voice. Academy of Management Journal, 62(3), 828-49.